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English Statement of Intent

 

At Radcliffe on Trent Junior School, we strive to help our children to connect to the wider world through developing into articulate and imaginative communicators, who are well-equipped with the skills they need to become life-long learners. Therefore, we have designed our English curriculum with the intent that all children, regardless of background, will become fluent, insightful readers and technically skilled, creative writers. It is our intention to immerse our pupils in the wonders of quality texts to instill a love for reading, a passion for writing and the confidence to explore their imagination. Our children will engage with a range of genres and will progress their writing with an understanding of a wide range of styles as they advance through year groups.

At ROTJS, we believe that English plays an incredibly important role across our broader curriculum. Therefore, careful links are made across the school to ensure that children’s English learning is relevant and meaningful: where possible linking our reading and writing to aid the consolidation of skills and a deeper understanding across all aspects of learning.

At the Juniors, we build upon the reading foundations laid down in the Infant School and use the same phonics and reading scheme (ReadWriteInc.) to ensure smooth transition in reading skills from KS1

ROTJS Reading Curriculum

 

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Decoding

Apply their growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes, both to read aloud and to understand the meaning of new words they meet

 

Read further exception words, noting the unusual correspondences between spelling and sound, and where these occur in the word

Apply their growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes, both to read aloud and to understand the meaning of new words they meet

 

Read further exception words, noting the unusual correspondences between spelling and sound, and where these occur in the word

Apply their growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes (morphology and etymology), both to read aloud and to understand the meaning of new words that they meet

Apply their growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes (morphology and etymology), both to read aloud and to understand the meaning of new words that they meet

Retrieval

Identify the simple, most obvious points in a text

 

Make comments that include quotations and references to a text, even if they are not always relevant

Identify some relevant points in the text

 

Comments are supported by some generally relevant quotations and references

Identify relevant points clearly, including summarising and synthesising information from different sources or places in the text

 

Comments incorporate apt textual references and quotations support my main ideas or argument

 

Read and carefully select the right words and phrases in a text to support a view

 

Draw on their own knowledge of to develop an argument

 

Read critically and develop a coherent interpretation of texts by drawing on imaginative insights which are supported by wider textual knowledge

 

Familiarity with texts

Listening to and discussing a wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and reference books or textbooks

 

Reading books that are structured in different ways and reading for a range of purposes

 

Recognise some ideas about when and where the text is set or whether the text is similar or different to their own experiences

Increasing their familiarity with a wide range of books, including fairy stories, myths and legends, and retelling some of these orally

 

Identifying themes and conventions in a wide range of books

 

Give some explanation of how the contexts in which texts are written and read contribute to meaning, e.g. how a novel relates to when/where it was written

Continuing to read and discuss an increasingly wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and reference books or textbooks

 

Reading books that are structured in different ways and reading for a range of purposes

 

Identifying themes and conventions in a wide range of books

 

Show some exploration of textual conventions or features used by writers from different periods and backgrounds

Making comparisons within and across books

 

Increasing their familiarity with a wide range of books, including myths, legends and traditional stories, modern fiction, fiction from our literary heritage, and books from other cultures and traditions

 

Identifying and discussing themes and conventions in and across a wide range of writing

 

Responses show some awareness of how a text may be influenced by earlier texts

Poetry and Performance

Prepare and perform a play script using a clear voice so listeners can understand

 

Prepare and perform a poem using a clear voice so listeners can understand

 

Recognise some of the different forms of poetry and make simple comparisons

 

Prepare and perform play scripts and poems, beginning to show understanding through intonation, tone, volume and action

 

Recognise different forms of poetry and compare their language, structure and presentation

Prepare and perform play scripts and a range of poetry by heart, showing understanding through intonation, tone and volume so that the meaning is clear to an audience

 

Prepare and perform play scripts and a range of poetry by heart, showing understanding through intonation, tone and volume so that the meaning is clear to an audience

 

Word Meanings

Learning to use dictionaries to check the meaning of words that they have read

Confidently able to use dictionaries to check the meaning of words that they have read

 

Learn to use context clues in the text to suggest what new vocabulary might mean

 

Use knowledge of spelling rules (prefixes and suffixes) to suggest what new vocabulary might mean

 

Confidently able to use dictionaries to check the meaning of words that they have read

 

Use context clues in the text to suggest what new vocabulary might mean

 

Begin to use knowledge of synonyms and word families to suggest what new vocabulary might mean

 

Confidently able to use dictionaries to check the meaning of words that they have read

 

Use context clues in the text to suggest what new vocabulary might mean

 

Use knowledge of synonyms, antonyms and word families to suggest what new vocabulary might mean

 

Understanding

Checking that the text makes sense to them and discussing their understanding

 

Learning to explain meaning of words in context

 

Asking questions about words, phrases or sections they do not understanding

 

Identifying the main point or a paragraph

 

 

 

 

Give a simple explanation for what they think is happening/the meaning of a text to check that their understanding is correct

 

Explaining the meaning of words in context

 

Asking questions to improve their understanding of a text

 

Identifying main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph and summarising these

 

Checking that the text makes sense to them, discussing their understanding and exploring the meaning of words in context

 

Asking questions to improve their understanding

 

Summarising the main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph and identifying key details to support the main ideas

Checking that the text makes sense to them, discussing their understanding and exploring the meaning of words in context

 

Asking questions to improve their understanding

 

Summarising the main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph and identifying key details to support the main ideas

 

Inference

Make ‘best guess’ comments that are inferences based on evidence from the text

 

Inferences are often correct, even if the best words or phrases are not selected to make the point

 

I can draw inferences about characters’ feelings and thoughts

Inferred meanings are explained by drawing on evidence from the text

 

Inferences and deductions are based on textual evidence

 

I can draw inferences about characters’ feelings and thoughts, justifying these with evidence

Comments are based in textual evidence and some attempt is made to identify different layers of meaning within the text

 

Comments consider how small details in the text contribute to the overall meaning

 

I can draw inferences about characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives, justifying these with evidence

Comments demonstrate an interpretation of the text, making connections between insights to tease out meanings

 

Clear understanding of how the text structure and language support the writer’s purpose and contribute to meaning

 

I can draw inferences about characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives, justifying these with evidence

Prediction

Make simple predictions to suggest what might happen next in a text

 

 

Predict what might happen next in a text based on evidence from what they have read so far

Make predictions based on details stated within the text, using evidence to support their viewpoint

 

Make some predictions based on details that have been implied within the text

 

 

 

Predicting what might happen from details stated and implied, using evidence to support their viewpoint

Authorial Intent

Discuss words and phrases that capture the reader’s interest and imagination

 

Identify basic features of a writer’s language but not always explain why those words are used, e.g.

“There are lots of adjectives”

 

Make simple comments on the writer’s choices, e.g.

“‘disgraceful’ is a good word to use to show he is upset”

 

Identify the main purpose of a text and show some awareness of the writer’s viewpoint

Identifying how language, structure, and presentation contribute to meaning

 

Identify some features of a writer’s language, e.g.

“All of the questions make you want to find out what happens next”

 

Give simple explanations for language features identified, e.g. “They speak in short sentences which creates tension”

 

Comments show a developing awareness of authorial intent

 

Identify the main purpose of a text and the viewpoint of the writer

Give some detailed explanation of how language is used, e.g. identifying patterns or a structure in the use of language

 

Discuss and evaluate how the writer’s language choices contribute to the overall effect on the reader

 

Identify the main purpose of a text and the writer’s viewpoint using evidence

 

 

Comments about language choices are precise, e.g. showing how language used reflects a change in a character’s emotional state

 

Show appreciation of how the writer’s language, including figurative language (simile, hyperbole etc.) structure and presentation contribute to the overall effect on the reader

 

Responses develop some analytical or evaluative comment on the author’s viewpoint and the purpose of the text

Non-fiction

Identify the simple, most obvious points in a text

 

Retrieve and record information from non-fiction texts

 

Begin to use contents pages and indexes to locate information

 

Identify the key features of non-fiction writing, e.g. titles, subtitles, bullet points

 

 

 

 

Identify the key points in a text

 

Retrieve and record information from non-fiction texts

 

Use contents pages and indexes to locate information

 

Begin to use glossaries to learn the definitions for new vocabulary

 

Give simple explanations of how the key features and structure of non-fiction writing helps the reader

 

Retrieve, record and present information from non-fiction

 

Use contents pages and indexes to locate information

 

Use glossaries to learn the definitions for new vocabulary

 

Distinguish between statements of fact and opinion

 

Explain how the key features and structure of non-fiction writing help the reader

 

Retrieve, record and present information from non-fiction

 

Use contents pages and indexes to locate information

 

Use glossaries to learn the definitions for new vocabulary

 

Distinguish between statements of fact and opinion

 

Explain how the key features and structure of non-fiction writing help the reader

 

Discussing Reading

Participate in discussion about both books that are read to them and those they can read for themselves, taking turns and listening to what others say

 

Make simple connections between texts, e.g. similarities in plot, topic, characters or by the same author

 

 

 

Participate in discussion about both books that are read to them and those they can read for themselves, sharing their own opinions about texts and authors

 

Comments identify similarities and difference between texts or versions of texts with some explanation, e.g. narrative conventions in traditional tales

 

 

Recommend books that they have read to their peers, giving reasons for their choices

 

Participate in discussions about books, building on their own and others’ ideas and challenging views courteously

 

Explain and discuss their understanding of what they have read

 

Provide reasoned justifications for their views

 

 

Recommend books that they have read to their peers, giving reasons for their choices

 

Participate in discussions about books, building on their own and others’ ideas and challenging views courteously

 

Explain and discuss their understanding of what they have read, including through formal presentations and debates,

 

Provide reasoned justifications for their views

 

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