Menu
Home Page

Writing

English Statement of Intent

 

At Radcliffe on Trent Junior School, we strive to help our children to connect to the wider world through developing into articulate and imaginative communicators, who are well-equipped with the skills they need to become life-long learners. Therefore, we have designed our English curriculum with the intent that all children, regardless of background, will become fluent, insightful readers and technically skilled, creative writers. It is our intention to immerse our pupils in the wonders of quality texts to instill a love for reading, a passion for writing and the confidence to explore their imagination. Our children will engage with a range of genres and will progress their writing with an understanding of a wide range of styles as they advance through year groups.

At ROTJS, we believe that English plays an incredibly important role across our broader curriculum. Therefore, careful links are made across the school to ensure that children’s English learning is relevant and meaningful: where possible linking our reading and writing to aid the consolidation of skills and a deeper understanding across all aspects of learning.

Writing Statement of Intent

The intent of our Writing curriculum is for all of our children to:

· See writing as an interesting and enjoyable process

· Write for a purpose

· Take ownership of their own writing

· Acquire the ability to organise, plan and edit their own work

 

Connecting with learning

Our aim is to provide children with key transferrable writing skills to develop each year, that can be used throughout each phase of their education and aid in their transition to secondary school and beyond. At ROTJS, we intend for our children to be able to confidently communicate their knowledge, ideas and emotions through their writing. We want pupils to acquire a wide vocabulary, a solid understanding of grammar and be able to spell new words by effectively applying the patterns and rules they learn. To encourage higher quality writing, the children are provided with varied modes of stimuli as we believe that this will inspire our learners to achieve and be able to apply their skills to a range of different contexts in future learning. We believe that all good writers refine and edit their own writing, so we want children to develop independence in being able to identify their own areas for improvement in all pieces of writing, editing their work effectively during and after the writing process.

 

Connecting with others

We want our children to develop the tools necessary to communicate their thoughts, ideas and feelings successfully in a wide range of different forms.  Therefore, we intend for our creative writers to write clearly, accurately and coherently, adapting their language and style in and for a range of contexts, purposes and audiences. Although classic novels play an important role in giving our children a grounding in narrative structures, we ensure that consideration is given in each year group to various contemporary issues to guarantee that the curriculum is relevant, promotes cultural awareness and recognises social responsibilities for the modern world.

 

Connecting with our community

Our Writing curriculum is designed to enable pupils to develop a sense of themselves as unique individuals (valuing their strengths, skills and potential), to have high aspirations and to recognise their position in the local community and beyond. Therefore, our Writing curriculum aims for our children to discover and write about former residents of the area whilst recognising their own position within the locality and the role they can play in sustainability for the good of the planet.

ROTJS Writing Curriculum

 

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Vocabulary

I can modify nouns by using one or more precise adjectives.

I can include some interesting vocabulary in my writing.

I can use a thesaurus to improve my vocabulary.

I can use interesting and ambitious vocabulary.

I can explain why I choose certain words and phrases.

I can use a thesaurus to improve my vocabulary.

My vocabulary choices are more thoughtful and relevant.

I can choose words for deliberate effect e.g. stationary instead of stopped.

I can use a thesaurus to improve my vocabulary.

My vocabulary choices are more precise, relevant and ambitious.

I intentionally choose words to have an emotional impact upon my reader.

Punctuation

I can use capital letters

I can use full stops

I can use question marks

I can use exclamation marks

I am beginning to understand how to use inverted commas to show direct speech.

I can use commas for lists and to separate lists of adjectives

I can use ellipsis to keep the reader hanging on (NB. Used effectively, not at the end of every paragraph)

I can use capital letters, full stops, question marks and exclamation marks accurately.

I can punctuate direct speech accurately using inverted commas and other punctuation.

I can use commas after fronted adverbials and to separate adjectives.

I can use apostrophes for possession

I can use capital letters, full stops, question marks and exclamation marks accurately.

I can use commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity.

I can use a colon to introduce a list.

I can use apostrophes for contraction

I can use brackets, dashes or commas to add additional information.

I can use capital letters, full stops, question marks, commas for lists, apostrophes for contractions and inverted commas/other punctuation to indicate direct speech accurately.

I can use semi-colons, dashes, colons, hyphens and, when necessary, use such punctuation precisely to enhance meaning and avoid ambiguity.

 

 

 

Grammar

I am beginning to use different sentence structures.

I can use ‘a’ and ‘an’ correctly, depending on whether the next words starts with a vowel.

I am beginning to use fronted adverbials to say when/where/how

I can use the present, past and future tenses accurately.

I can use conjunctions to link my ideas (e.g. and, but, so, because, or, while, when)

I can use prepositions (in, on, under, next to, underneath)

I can use adverbs – how (quickly, slowly), when (yesterday, then, next, afterwards), where (in the park, next to the tree)

I use different sentence structures.

I can use ‘a’ and ‘an’ correctly.

I can use fronted adverbials to say when/where/how.

I can write in standard English (e.g. we were not we was/ the correct use of what/that).

I can use conjunctions to link my ideas (and, but, so, because)

I am beginning to use conjunctions to develop ideas (although, however, nevertheless, despite the fact)

I can describe nouns in careful detail when I need to write about a complex object.

I am attempting grammatically complex sentences.

I can use a wider range of sentence structures.

I can use relative clauses beginning them with who, which, where, when, whose, that, with or appropriate detail.

I use the correct tense throughout a piece of writing.

I can use modal verbs.

I can use a range of conjunctions to develop my ideas effectively (Firstly, although, however, nevertheless, despite the fact)

I can use a range of strategies for beginning my sentences.

I can use expanded noun phrases and fronted adverbials.

I can use a wider range of sentence structures.

I can use relative clauses beginning them with who, which, where, when, whose, that, with or appropriate detail.

I can select vocabulary and grammatical structures that reflect what the writing requires, doing this mostly appropriately (contracted forms, passive verbs, modal verbs)

 

I can use verb tenses consistently and correctly through the writing

 

I can use a range of devices to build cohesion within and across a paragraph: conjunctions, adverbials for time and place, pronouns and synonyms.

 

Composition

I can use paragraphs although they may not always be accurate.

I can address my reader.

I can use structural features in non-fiction including sub-headings, bullet points and diagrams.

I can create characters, settings and plots.

In non-fiction, I am beginning to frame my writing with a simple introduction and conclusion.

My writing is interesting because I have thought about my ideas.

I can read aloud my own work so the meaning is clear to the listeners.

I can use my knowledge of the world and books I have read to influence my work.

 

I understand what paragraphs are and can use them correctly.

I can use paragraphs to reflect changes in: time, place and character.

I can address my reader.

I can use structural features in non-fiction including sub-headings, bullet points and diagrams.

My paragraphs have relevant openings.

In non-fiction, I can write a clear introduction, followed by logical points and a defined conclusion.

I can use effective character and setting descriptions: how characters look, react, talk or behave.

I can use genre specific compositional features.

I can develop my ideas in a creative and interesting way.

My writing is interesting because I am including writing tools for effect.

 

I can read aloud my own work so the meaning is clear to the listeners.

I can use my knowledge of the world and books I have read to influence my work.

I can organise my work into paragraphs.

My writing reflects the genre I am writing – across the whole piece.

I can address my reader.

I can use structural features in non-fiction including sub-headings, bullet points and diagrams.

I am beginning to use details across my work to help link paragraphs together into a full text.

I can make the structure of my paragraph more interesting.

I am beginning to use cohesive devices within paragraphs and across a text.

My writing is interesting because I have thought about the ‘flow’ and tone of my writing.

 

I can read aloud my own work so the meaning is clear to the listeners.

I can use my knowledge of the world and books I have read to influence my work.

 

I can write effectively for a range of purposes and audiences, selecting language that shows good awareness of the reader (e.g. the use of the first person in a diary; direct address in instructions and persuasive writing),

I can integrate dialogue in narratives to convey character and advance the action.

 

 

 

I can write effectively for a range of purposes and audiences, selecting the appropriate form and drawing independently on what they have read as models for their own writing (e.g. literary language, characterisation, structure)

distinguish between the language of speech and writing and choose the appropriate register

 

I can exercise an assured and conscious control over levels of formality, particularly through manipulating grammar and vocabulary to achieve this, including writing in the style of an author

 

I can read aloud my own work so the meaning is clear to the listeners.

I can use my knowledge of the world and books I have read to influence my work.

 

Handwriting

I can make sure others can read my handwriting.

I am beginning to join my letters when writing.

I know which letters to join and which to print.

I can make sure others can read my handwriting.

My joined handwriting is legible with most of the letters the same height and the correct distance apart.

I can make sure others can read my handwriting.

My handwriting style is neat, accurate, legible and fluent at speed.

I can maintain legibility in joined handwriting when writing at speed.

Spelling

I can spell some of words correctly (Year 3 & 4)

I spell most of the high frequency words correctly.

I can use the first three or four letters of a word to find it in a dictionary.

I can segment spoken words into phonemes. (this can be identified beyond written work)

I can spell the first set of homophones (e.g. there, they’re, their)

I can use the prefixes, mis-, dis-, im-, re-(this can be identified beyond written work)

I am beginning to use a dictionary to check my spelling.

I can spell almost all words correctly (Year 3 & 4)

I spell almost all of the high frequency words correctly.

I can use the first three or four letters of a word to find it in a dictionary.

I can use the suffixes –ly, -ation, -ous

I can use the prefixes, anti-, auto-, re-, de-, un-, dis- (this can be identified beyond written work)

I am beginning to use a dictionary to check my spelling.

I can spell almost all words correctly (Year 3 & 4)

I can spell some words correctly (Year 5 & 6)

I can use the first three or four letters of a word to find it in a dictionary.

I can use words and word parts that I know to help me spell new words.

I can add some prefixes and suffixes accurately.

I can use singular and plural words accurately.

I can use a dictionary to check my spelling.

I can spell correctly most words from the year 3/year 4 spelling lists.

I can spell correctly most words from the year 5/year 6 spelling lists.

Planning and Drafting

I can proof-read my work to check for simple errors and to correct spellings.

I am beginning to edit the content of my work based on suggestions made by my teacher.

I can use an effective format for planning.

I can plan in sufficient detail to ensure I can begin my work.

I can proof-read my work to check for simple errors and to correct spellings.

I am beginning edit my work based on suggestions made by my teacher.

I can use an effective format for planning.

I can plan in sufficient detail to ensure that I know what I am writing about as I write.

I can proof-read my work to improve content, correct spellings and punctuation mistakes.

I can edit my work based on suggestions made by my teacher.

I can use an effective format for planning.

I can plan in sufficient detail to ensure that I know what I am going to include in each section of my writing.

I understand that proof-reading my writing for errors in spelling and punctuation is part of the writing process.

I can edit my work based on suggestions made by my teacher and also independently identify ways I can improve my writing.

I can create an effective plan independently and have a clear idea of the structure and content of my writing.

Top